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Ministry of the Word - PARABLES, A complete Dossier
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A COMPLETE

DOSSIER ON

THE PARABLES

OF JESUS


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SARAH DIAS

Telephone: 25770684
9004000026

OCTOBER 2009


 

 

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

 

Fr. Lester Vaz - Who taught us The Parables of Jesus.

 

The Ministry Of the Word Program (Goregaon Seminary, Mumbai.)


 

 

 

 

PARABLES OF JESUS IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER


 

 

1. The two debtors

2. The rich fool

3.       Thewatchfulservants

4.The barren fig tree

5.The sower

6.The tares

7.The seed growing in secret

8.The mustard seed

9.The leaven

lO.The hidden treasure

11.The pearl of great price

12.Thedrawnet

13. The unmerciful servant

14.The good Samaritan

15.The friend at midnight

16. The chief seats

17.The great supper

18. The rash builder and king at war

19.The lost sheep

20.The lost coin

21.The prodigal son

22.The unjust steward

23.The unprofitable servants

24.The importunate widow

25.The Phaisee and publican

26.The laborers in the vineyard

27.The pounds

28.The two sons

29.The wicked husbandmen

30.The marriage of the king's son

31.The ten virgins

32.The talents


Matt                           Mark                     Luke
7:36-50

12:16-21
12:35-40
13:6-9

13:1-9,18-23            4:1-9,14-20         8:4-15
13:24-30, 36-43

4:26-29

13:31-32                   4:30-32                13:18-19

13:33                                                        13:20-21
13:44

13:45-46
13:47-50
18:21-35
10:25-37
11:5-13
14:7-11
14:15-24
14:25-35

18:12-14                                                 15:3-7 15:8-10

15:11-32 16:1-9

17:5-10
18:1-8
18:9-14
20:1-16
19:11-27
21:23-32

21:33-46                   12:1-12                20:9-18
22:1-14

25:1-13
25:14-30


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction to Parables:

During His earthly ministry, as Jesus went about preaching and teaching, He

frequently used parables - cf. Mt 13:1-3. 13:34-35. It has been estimated that at least one-third of Jesus' recorded teaching is found in the parables.

Parables as a teaching tools were not unique to the Lord, but were uniquely used & applied to proclaim the kingdom of God. He utilized ever facet of daily life in his parables, revealing the depth of his understanding. Crowds thronged to hear him & through the skillful use of the parables, he used simple
incidence of life to imprint vividly on their minds his great spiritual truth.

Of the four canonical gospels the parables are almost all in the three synoptic gospels. The Gospel of Luke contains both the largest total number of parables

(24) and the largest number of unique parables found nowhere else (10);

The Gospel of Matthew contains 23 parables of which six are unique;

and the Gospel of Mark contains eight parables of which only one (the Parable of the Growing Seed) is unique. The Gospel of John contains only the story of the Vine, which some consider to be a parable.

The word parable occurs 48 times in the first three gospels, and twice in Hebrews 9:9 and 11:19. A parable is an earthly story with a heavenly meaning.

It is not possible to place the parable in historical order, nor is it necessary for it, for it is the teaching that is important nor their historical order. It is possible perhaps probable that the parables have undergone changes. This may have occurred because the Gospels were recorded long after the ministry of Jesus. The parables are thought to have been transmitted orally for years before
being written down.

Thus the oral tradition or expression of his teaching may have varied some what from the original, this may have produced some of the scriptural
discrepancies in the parables, but at this late date it would be impossible to determine these potential variations, therefore there is no practical alternative to accepting the recorded word as authentic. Parables greatly enhance the Lords teachings. Under the masterful usage they became a teaching method "So stimulating, so full of interest in its unapproachable beauty & finish


 

 

 

 

 

Origin of Parables

 

The word parable comes from the Greek word 'parabole' as translated from

the Hebrew 'mashal' in Greek it means to put forth one thing before or besides another. But in Hebrew from which it was originally translated, it has a wider significance, exemplified by the balance metrical form of the poetic books & teachings of the Old Testament. This method of teaching was not new, The parables or mashal was a mode of instructions already familiar to the Israel since the days of judges, & was in familiar & constant use among the Rabbis, Jewish teachers use the parable as a common & well understood method of illustration.

Historical Interpretation

Throughout Christian history, parables have been interpreted allegorically, often with interpreters finding a new, hidden meaning for every object or figure in the story.

Modern Interpretation

Scholars have begun to recognize that there may be only one or two main points behind each parable, and some purport a single, unifying purpose behind each parable.

Purpose

Mark 4:10-12, Matthew 13:10-17 and Luke 8:9-10 offer an explanation as to why Jesus would teach in parables. These verses say that whenever Jesus
would go off by himself (away from the crowds of followers he attracted)
those close to him and the disciples would ask about the parables. He told
them that they had been given the secret of the Kingdom of God (a concept commonly called the Messianic Secret), but that outsiders did not have this secret, so everything to them is given in parables, never to be fully
understood, otherwise they might find forgiveness, citing variations of Isaiah
6:9-10. Matthew 13:12 adds: "Whoever has will be given more, and he will have an abundance. Whoever does not have, even what he has will be taken from him." It is a saying also found in Mark 4:25, Matthew 25:29 and Luke 8:18r and 19:26. Mark 4:33-34 and Matthew 13:34-35 repeat that Jesus would only speak to the "crowds" in parables, while secretly, in private, explaining everything to his disciples.


 

 

 

 

 

It is believed Jesus used parables because they provoked thought and coaxed the listeners into participating more actively as they considered the parables' ambiguous content. According to him, the belief that Jesus taught secret
meanings to his disciples is a product of the Early Christian tradition and does not originate with Jesus himself

"The simple meaning of these parables, however, was lost later on, and they were taken to be allegories and mysteries, especially when they alluded to the Messianic expectations, about which it was not safe to speak in public, as they assumed the end of the kingdom of Satan

 

 

Why did Jesus speak in parables ?

A. THE PRIMARY PURPOSE WAS TO "CONCEAL"...

1. Jesus began speaking in parables because of the hardness of many

people's hearts - cf. Mt 13:10-17 a. The disciples' attitude was such that they were blessed to learn "the mysteries of the kingdom of heaven"

- Mt 13: 10-12,16-1    b. But because of the hard hearts of many in the multitude, Jesus began speaking to them in parables - Mt 13:13-15:
cf. Mk 4:10-12   c. He would then explain the parables in private to His
disciples - Mk 4:33-34

2. By resorting to parables, Jesus effectively separated the truth-seekers from the curiosity-seekers!   a. Those seeking the truth would say "Explain to us the parable..." - Mt 13:36   b. Whereas the simply curious could easily be sent
away

3. Indeed, Jesus used parables to carry out Divine judgment...

-cf. Mt 13:12

a. "For whoever has (a good heart, listening ears), to him more will be given, and he will have abundance (by virtue of the parable being explained)"

b. "But whoever does not have (a good heart, listening ears), even what he has will be taken away from him (by virtue of being sent away with the
multitude)"

B. BUT ANOTHER PURPOSE WAS TO "REVEAL"...

1. Even though the primary purpose in telling parables was to conceal the "mysteries of the kingdom of heaven" from the multitude!

a. For once the disciples understood the basic meaning of the parables...
             b
...... the comparison of the "known" (earthly) truths with the "unknown" (heavenly) truths would shed further light on the unknown

2. Therefore, with the help of the Lord's explanation of His parables we

can learn more about "the mysteries of the kingdom of heaven" - cf. Mt 13:34-35


 

 

 

 

 

The purpose of Jesus' parables is to introduce the mysteies of the kingdom of God or heaven. The parable is oten an expanded proverb, and the proverb is a condensed parable. Jesus' parables are not mere illustrations, but internal analogies, nature becoming a witness for the spiritual world; whatever is found in the earthly exists also in the heavenly kingdom. Jesus was teaching parables to those who had ears to hear.

In the Synoptics ... we thirty-three in all; but some have raised the number even to sixty, by including proverbial expressions."

 

Parables of Jesus— What are parables?

Derived from the word "parabalio," the word "parable" signifies a comparison between two objects. Thus, a parable may contain one main word which is used to mirror another singular concept or object. Matthew 13:33 is one
example: "He told them still another parable: 'The kingdom of heaven is like yeast that a woman took and mixed into a large amount of flour until it worked all through the dough."' Here, the kingdom of heaven is compared to one
thing, "yeast." Sometimes the truth is conveyed by the entire story, such as the parable of the two sons (Luke 15:11-32).

Because parables resemble probable happenings, some Bible scholars believe the stories actually happened. The parable of the rich man and Lazarus found in Luke 16:19-31 is one such example. Some argue that this parable includes real people and events; others believe that it was a fictional lesson directed by Jesus at the hardened hearts of His day.

In contrast to allegories, parables generally contain one point rather than

Jesus explained the purpose of parables Himself. "Unto you It is given to know the mystery of the kingdom of God, but unto them that are without, all these things are done in parables. That seeing they may see and not perceive and heaing they may hear and not understand, lest at any time they should be converted and their sins should be forgiven them." Even this explanation of parables may indeed be a parable unto itself. What He meant is that these can only be understood by those willing to learn with spiitual eyes and spiitual ears to hear and see and understand. Those who cannot bring themselves to come to the light to expose their own sins will not understand and be not
converted. Was Jesus concealing the truth by the use of the parables? No, He
was revealing the truth, but in a way, only to those willing to open their eyes and ears to the truth in faith. Then the spirit would guide them into all truth and those who choose to be blind and deaf to His words will not understand.



How do we understand the parables ?

 

"The LORD sent Nathan to David. When he came to him, he said, There were two men in a certain town, one rich and the other poor. The rich man had a very large number of sheep and cattle, but the poor man had nothing except one little ewe iamb he had bought. He raised it, and it grew up with him and his children. It shared his food, drank from his cup and even slept in his arms. It was like a daughter to him. Now a traveler came to the rich man, but the rich man refrained from taking one of his own sheep or cattle to prepare a

meal for the traveler who had come to him. Instead, he took the ewe lamb that belonged to the poor man and prepared it for the one who had come to him'" (2 Samuel 12:1-4).

Although David had committed grave sins, God used the parable to reach his heart. Upon first hearing the parable, David condemned himself by stating that such a man should die. Nathan then exclaimed, "You are the man." How was David brought under conviction? David was made to see the folly of his ways by the clear illustration of Nathan's Spirit-inspired parable. The Word of God, no matter how simply portrayed, can touch a heart of faith.

Joachim Jeremiah:"The conclusion is in evitable that we are dealing with a

particular trust worthy tradition. We stand in front of Jesus, when we read the Parable.

Parable are words from the mouth of Jesus. Jesus Parable are masterpieces & they are challenging like any good drama, there is always a growing suspense. PG Woodhouse defines Parables as a pleasant yarn to which you listen growing in interest & as you listen the message suddenly pops outs knocks you out & leaves you flat on the back 2 Saml2:i-6

In every Parable of Jesus, Jesus gives you a revelation which demands a revolution & lead you to a resolution

REVELATION                REVOLUTION             RESOLUTION.

Ater listening to a Parables you will never remain the same, you will either be better or worse if you ignore it.


 

 

 

 

 

Classiications of Jesus Parables-

 

Sec I  1. 10 PARABLES ON GODS OFFER OF SALVATION TO SINNERS.

 

1. Sick & healthy. Mt 9:9-13

2. Two sons.Mt 21:28-33

3. Two debtors.Lk 7:41-43

4. Lost Sheep Lk 15:3-7

5. Lost Coin. Lk 15:8

6. Lost son.Lk 15:11

7. Wicked vine dressers.Mt 21:33-46

8. Great banquet.Mt 22:11-14; Lk 14:15-24

9. Generous Employer.Mt 20:1-16

10. Pharisee & the tax collector.Lk 18:9-14

 

Sec II   ACCEPT GODS OFFER OF SALVATION TODAY

 

2:1 Act now before to is too late                10 Parables

2:2 Act now take necessary action             7 Parables

2:3 Act now let nothing impede you           7 Parables

2:4 Act now it is supremely worthy.           2 Parables

2:5 Act now this is your last chance           1 Parables

 

2:1 ACT NOW BEFORE IT IS TOO LATE.                    10 Parables

 

2:1.1 NOCTURNAL BURGLAR                  Mt 24:43-44;   Lk 12:39-40

2:1.2 THE 10 MAIDENS                                Mt 25:1-13.

2:1.3 THE DOOR KEEPER                              Mt 13:33-37;    Lk 12:35-38

2:1.4 SERVENT ENTRUSTED WITH SUPERVISION   Mt 24:45 - 51; Lk          12 :42-46

2: 1.5 TALENTS                                    Mt 25 : 14 - 30; Lk 19 : 12 - 27

2: 1.6 THE WEDDING GARMENTS                                       Mt 22: 11 - 13.

2: 1.7 Simile snare & the unwary (bird)                                  Lk 21: 34 - 36

2: 1.8   Simile- Budding Fig tree Mk 13: 28, 29. Lk 17: 26 - 27; 28 - 30. 2: 1.9 Simile concerning harvest time Mt 24 : 32 - 33; Lk 21 : 29 - 31 2: 1.10 EYE LAMP OF THE BODY Mt: 22 -23; Lk 11: 34 - 36

2 : 2. ACT NOW, TAKE NECESSARY ACTION (7  PARABLES^

 

Develops the message of the early group. It gives practical ways to respond to the parable

2:2.1 DEBTORS               Mt 5:25, 26; Lk 12: 58,59

2 : 2.2 THE DISHONEST STEWARD    Lk 16; 1-8.

2 : 2.3 THE RETURN OF THE UNCLEAN SPIRIT Mt 12: 43-45a; Lk 11:24-26.

2 : 2.4 CHILDREN            MARKET PLACE      Mt 11: 16 - 19   Simile

2 : 2.5 NEW GARMENTS /NEW SKINS Lk 5 : 36 - 39

2 : 2.6 PLOUGH MAN Lk 9 : 61,62;   act now take necessary action


 

 

 

 

 

 

2 : 2.7a. TOWER BUILDER,   Lk 14:28-32

2.2.7b KING CONTEMPLATING A CAMPAIGN Lk 14:28-32

 

2 : 3.   ACT NOW LET NOTHING IMPEDE YOU.                      7 Parables.

 

2 : 3.1 RICH FOOL                      Luke     12:16 - 21.

2 : 3.2 RICHMAN & LAZARUS   Lk 16 : 19 - 31.

2 : 3.3. WEDDING FEAST                22:1 -14; Lk 14 : 15 - 24.

2 : 3.4 CAMEL/NEEDLE s/m/YeMk 10:24; Setting & context all are same Mt
             
19:24.AI1 are same Lkl8: 25

2 : 3.5 LET THE DEAD BURRY THE DEAD Mt 8 : 21 -22; Lk 9 :59 - 60.

2 : 3.6    2 MEN IN THE FIELD   Mt 24 : 40; Lk 34 : 36   Metaphor

2 : 3.7    2 WOMEN AT THE MEAL metaphor  Mt 24 :41;   Lk 17 : 35.

 

2:4.   ACT NOW IT IS SUPREME WORTH IT.

(TWIN PARABLES')

 

2 : 4.1 THE TREASURE   Mt 13 : 4

2 : 4.2 THE PEARL Mt 13 45 - 46.

2 : 5. ACT NOW THIS IS YOUR LAST CHANCE.     I PARABLE

2 : 5. 1 THE UNPRODUCTIVE FIG TREE Lk 13:6-9

 

3 .1 WE LIVE THE KINGDOM LIFE - IN CONFIDENT HOPE.                   (6 PARABLES^

 

3 .1.1. Mustard seed Mk 4:30-32

3 1.2. Leaven Lk 13:20-21

3. 1.3 THE SOWER.                Mk4 : 3 - 8; Mt 13 : 3 - 8; Lk 8 : 4- 8.

3 .1.4 PATIENT FARMER     Mk 4 : 26 - 29

3.!. 5   THE UNJUST JUDGE                Lk 18 : 2 -8. CONFIDENT HOPE

3 .1.6 THE UNOBLIGING FRIEND             Lk 11: 5 - 8.

 

3.2 PATIENT & TOLERANCE

 

3. 2.1 WHEAT / WEEDS    Mt 13 : 24 - 34.

3 .2.2 NET GOOD DRAGNET / BAD FISH                     Mt 13 : 47 - 50.

 

3 .3   OBEDIENCE TO GOD / JESUS WORD

 

3.3.1. THE 2 FOUNDATIONS                       Mt 7: 24 - 27;  Lk 6 : 47 - 49.

3.3.2. THE 2 SONS           Mt 21 : 28 - 32                 See (1.2) Gods Offer of salvation

3.3.3. THE SOWER                Mk4 : 14 - 20; Mt 13 : 18 - 23;   Lk 8 : 1 - 15.


 

 

 

 

 

3 .4   PRAYER there are 2 parables that teach on prayer.

 

3.4.1. PHARISEE & THE TAX COLLECTOR (originally 2 p)

Lk 18:9-14          (1.10)

3.4.2. THE UNJUST JUDGE                  (3 1.5) Mt 13: 47—50.

3.4.3. UNOBLIGATING FRIEND           (3 1.6)   Lk 11: 5-8

 

3 5.  LOVE OF NEIGHBOUR

 

3.5.1. Good Samaritan                     Jn 15:12.   Lk 10:25—37.

3.5.2. Last Judgment                         Mt 5:24-26

3.5.3 Unfaithful servant                  Mt 24:45-51 & Lk 12:41-48

 

3 .6. STEWARDSHIP

 

3.6.1 Refer to 2 .1.4 Servant / Supervisor.

3.6.2 Refer to 2. 1.3 Doorkeeper.

3.6.3 Refer to 2 .1.5 Talents.

3.6.4 Refer to 2. 2.2 Dishonest Steward.

3.6.5 Refer to 2. 5.1 Unproductive Fig Tree.

 

3  7. MISSION

 

3.7.1. Great Supper                                      Mt 22:1 -14; Lk 14: 16—24.


 

 

 

 

 

 

Classification of the Parables ofJesus:

1 God offer of salvation to sinners. These Parables offer the Good News that God is offering ( Good News to the sinners)

2 Accept Gods offer today / now

3 Live in the Kingdom of life today—(a)with God             -

(b) Neighbour

 

1. GODS OFFER OF SALVATION TO SINNERS:

*The Gospels do not only assert that the KOG is here but it also highlights the fact that salvation is being offered to ALL Jews & Gentiles alike.
Specially to the despised & the lost (also to the Pharisees)
*Who are the 10 Parables addressed to:

They are addressed not to the sinners / despised but to the opponents of Jesus. *The main purpose of the Parables is not to present the Good News (God offer of Salvation, to sinners) but the defense / vindications.

*They are self defense P & yet also an offer to the Pharisees to change.

 

1. 10 PARABLES ON GODS OFFER OF SALVATION TO SINNERS.

1. Sick & healthy.

2. Two sons.

3. Two debtors.

4. Lost sheep.

5. Lost Coin.

6. Lost son.

7. Wicked vine dressers.

8. Great banquet.

9. Generous Employer.

10. Pharisee & the tax collector.

 

 

1.1 Sick & healthy.    Mk 2:13-17: Mt 9:9-13: Lk 5:27-32. Host)- Lk 19:10

As the sick needs the physician, so do sinners, Sinners who lead immoral life need Jesus.

Jesus seems to imply that the scribes & the Pharisees do not need healing

Jesus comes to help the needy but not the deserving Rom 5:6-8; Rom 12:17-21 Mix with good people & the bad


 

 

 

PARABLE OF REPENTENCE:

1.2 ■ THE PARABLE OF THE TWO SONS Matt. 21:23-32

Mt21.23 when ne entered the temple, the chiefpriests and the elders of the people came to him as he was teaching, and said, "By what authority are you doing these things, and who gave you this authority?"24Jesus said to them, "I will also ask you one question; ifyou tell me the answe ,

then I will also tell you by what authority I do these things. 25Did the

baptism ofJohn come from heaven, or was it of human origin?"And they argued with one another, "If we say, From heaven, 'he will say to us,
'Why then did you not believe him?'26But if we say, Vf human origin,' we are afraid of the crowd; for all regard John as a prophet ,/27So they
answered Jesus, "We do not know. "And he said to them, "Neither will I tell you by what authority I am doing these things.

28"What do you think? A man had two sons; he went to the first and said, Son, go and work in the vineyard today. ,29He answered, 7 will not; but later he changed his mind and went. 30The father went to the second and said the same; and he answered, I go, sir; but he did not go. 31 Which of the two did the will ofhis father?" They said, "The first "Jesus said to

them, "Truly I tell you, the tax collectors and the prostitutes are going

into the kingdom of God ahead ofyou. 32For John came to you in the way of righteousness and you did not believe him, but the tax collectors and the prostitutes believed him; and even after you saw it, you did not
change your minds and believe him.

INTRODUCTION. The parable of the two sons followed the questioning of the authority of Jesus by the chief priests and elders. Jesus countered their question by one of his own-was the baptism of John from heaven or men? The chief priests could not answer the question. If they said, "from heaven," then they would be condemned for not believing John. If they said, "from men," they feared the multitude who believed John was a

prophet. Jesus then spoke the parable.

A man who owned a vineyard had two sons. The father asked the first


 

 

 

 

son to go work in the vineyard. He flatly and rudely refused, but later repented and went. The father asked the second son to go to the
vineyard and work. The second son politely and respectfully agreed, but did not. Which of the two sons did the will of the father? (Note: the text

regarding the actions of the two sons varies depending on the version of the Bibie used.)

Although this parable is a simple story, the application and meaning are significant. The first son (second son in some versions), who refused hrs father but repented, represents the publicans (tax collectors) and sinners of Jesus' day who openly transgressed the laws of God.  However, when John the Baptist preached the baptism of repentance for the remission of sins (Mark 1:4; Luke 3:3), these social and moral outcasts believed and repented, doing the will of the Father.

The second son (first son in some versions), who agreed to work, but did not, represents the religious leaders, chief priests, and elders. They were proud of their righteousness and works of the law. Nevertheless, they did not believe the preaching of John, and when they saw the repentance of the publicans and sinners, they still did not believe. They professed zeal for the Father with an outward display of obedience, but inwardly they

refused the word of God.

 

A. THE PARABLE

1. What question did the chief priests and elders ask Jesus?           (Matt.

21:23)

, "By what authority are you doing these things, and who gave you this authority?"

 

2. What question did Jesus ask the religious leaders?          (Matt. 21:24-25)

"I will also ask you one question; if you tell me the answer, then I will also tell you by what authority I do these things. 25Did the baptism of John come from heaven, or was it of human origin?"

3. What problem did this present to the religious leaders?         (Matt 21:25-26)

If we say, 'From heaven,' he will say to us, "Why then did you not believe him?' But if we say, 'Of human origin' we are afraid of


 

 

 

 

 

the crowd; for all regard John as a prophet

4. What was the religious leaders' answer to Jesus, and what was his reply to them? (Matt. 21:27) "We do not know." And he said to

them, "Neither will I tell you by what authority I am doing these things

 

5. Jesus then spoke the parable. When the man with two sons asked his first son to work in the vineyard, what was the answer? (The answer may

differ depending on the Bible version used.)       (Matt. 21:28-29) He

answered, 'I will not'; but later he changed his mind and went.

 

6. What response did the second son give to his father?           (Again the

answer may differ depending on the Bible version used.)         (Matt. 21:30) yI

go, sir'; but he did not go

 

7. When Jesus asked the religious leaders, who did the will of the father,

what was their answer?     (Again the answer may differ.)      (Matt. 21:31)

They said, "The first.

8. What did Jesus tell these men about the publicans and sinners?                                                                                                                    (Matt.

21:31) Truly I tell you, the tax collectors and the prostitutes are going into the kingdom of God ahead of you

9. What contrast did Jesus make between these religious leaders and the publicans and sinners? (Matt. 21:32) 32For John came to you in the

way of righteousness and you did not believe him, but the tax collectors and the prostitutes believed him;

 

10. One time when Jesus was teaching the multitudes, He spoke to them about John. What had the publicans done when they heard the message of John? What had the Pharisees and lawyers done? (Luke 7:29-30) And

all the people who heard this, including the tax collectors,

acknowledged the justice of God, because they had been

baptized with John's baptism. 30But by refusing to be baptized

by him, the Pharisees and the lawyers rejected God's purpose for themselves


 

 

 

 

 

B. THE LESSON

 

»    James gives a brief but pointed lesson for the parable of the two sons. "But be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only..." (Jas. 1:22).

 

 

1.3 PARABLES OF FORGIVENESS

THE PARABLE OF THE TWO DEBTORS Luke 7:36-50

7:36 One of the Pharisees asked Jesus to eat with him, and he went into the Pharisees house and took his place at the table. 37And a woman in the city, who was a sinner, having learned that he was eating in the
Pharisees house, brought an alabasterjar of ointment. 38She stood
behind him at his feet, weeping, and began to bathe his feet with her tears and to dry them with her hair. Then she continued kissing his feet
and anointing them with the ointment 39Now when the Pharisee who had invited him saw it, he said to himself, "If this man were a prophet, he

would have known who and what kind of woman this is who is touching him—that she is a sinner. "40Jesus spoke up and said to him, "Simon, I have something to say to you." "Teacher, "he replied, "Speak "41 "A
certain creditor had two debtors; one owed five hundred denarii, and the other fifty. 42When they could not pay, he canceled the debts for both of them. Now which of them will love him more?"43Simon answered, "I
suppose the one for whom he canceled the greater debt. "And Jesus said to him, "You have judged rightly. //44Then turning toward the woman, he said to Simon, "Do you see this woman? I entered your house; you gave me no water for my feet, but she has bathed my feet with her tears and

dried them with her hair. 45You gave me no kiss, but from the time I

came in she has not stopped kissing my feet.46 You did not anoint my

head with oil, but she has anointed my feet with ointment. 47 Therefore, I tell you, her sins, which were many, have been forgiven; hence she has shown great love. But the one to whom little is forgiven, loves little." 48Then he said to her, "Your sins are forgiven. "49But those who were at the table with him began to say among themselves, "Who is this who even forgives sins?"50And he said to the woman, "Your faith has saved you; go in peace."


 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION. In this parable Jesus was invited to the house of Simon the Pharisee for a meal. The homes of the wealthy usually
consisted of several rooms opening onto a courtyard where meals were eaten in the warm weather. People of that day usually reclined when eating, leaning on the left elbow with the right hand free and the feet stretched out behind.

Rabbis (masters, teachers) were constantly followed by people eager to

hear their words. It was not at all unusual for people to follow them into a house and stand behind them while they were dining in order to learn
from them. In this story a woman who was a sinner entered Simon's
house and stood behind Jesus while He dined. She brought with her an alabaster box of ointment as a gift for Jesus.

Simon was a Pharisee who was very careful to keep the law and looked with contempt on anyone who did not. Yet Simon did not extend the
common hospitality of the day to Jesus. When a guest arrived, a servant stood at the door with water to wash the guest's feet. While the guest reclined at the table, a servant dropped a little scented oil on the guest's hair or burned sweet incense around his head for a short period. When a Rabbi came to dine, the host greeted him with a kiss of peace. All of these acts of common hospitality Simon did not do for Jesus.

As the woman stood behind Jesus, she was overwhelmed by emotion and began to weep. When her tears fell on his feet, she loosened her hair and wiped them dry. Next she kissed his feet and anointed them with the
perfume. The woman acted from a deep sense of love for Jesus. She was painfully aware of her sinful condition and wished to express her gratitude to the one who had freed her from the bondage of her sins.

For Simon this incident was extremely embarrassing. If the money to buy the ointment came as a result of the woman's sinful life, the gift was an abomination (Deut. 23:18). Untying her hair in public was very immodest, and touching one of his guests was regarded as an act of defilement.
Jesus knew Simon's thoughts and thus told him the parable.


 

 

 

 

 

A. THE PARABLE

1.  Who invited Jesus to eat with him?      (Luke 7:36) One of the Pharisees

invited Jesus

2. Describe the woman. What did she bring with her?           (Luke 7:37) A

sinner women, Alabaster jar of ointment.

3. Describe the woman's actions.       (Luke 7:38) And stood at his feet

behind him weeping, and began to wash his feet with tears, and did wipe them with the hairs of her head, and kissed his feet, and anointed them with the ointment

4. What did the Pharisee say to himself?        (Luke 7:39) Now when the

Pharisee which had bidden him saw it, he spoke within himself, saying, This man, if he were a prophet, would have known who and what manner of woman this is that toucheth him: for she is a sinner.

5. What did Jesus say to the Pharisee? What was the Pharisee's name? (Luke 7:40) Simon, I have something to say to you.' "Teacher/ he replied, 'speak'

6. What was the amount of the debt owed by each debtor? (Luke 7:41) A

certain creditor had two debtors; one owed five hundred denarii, and the other fifty. 4

 

Note.  The denarius (pence, KJV; shilling, ASV) was a Roman coin

containing about seventeen cents worth of silver metal and was the

amount of one days wage in New Testament times.  Five hundred denarii would be about $85.00 and more than one years earnings. Fifty denarii would be $8.50 and more than one months wages. Both amounts were considerable sums at that time.

7. What did the creditor do? What question did Jesus ask of Simon?

(Luke 7:42) When they could not pay, he cancelled the debts for both of them. Now which of them will love him more?'

8. What was Simon's answer? Was he correct in his interpretation of the parable? (Luke 7:43) 'I suppose the one for whom he cancelled the greater debt.' And Jesus said to him, 'You have judged rightly


 

 

 

 

 

Note. By his answer Simon pronouncedjudgment upon himself. He was a debtor to Jesus, but he did not seek Jesus' forgiveness. In addition, his lack of love proved he did not have forgiveness.

9. List the acts of hospitality Simon had neglected to do for Jesus.            (Luke

7:44-46) you gave me no water for my feet, but she has bathed my feet with her tears and dried them with her hair. 45You gave me no kiss, but from the time I came in she has not stopped kissing my feet. 46You did not anoint my head with oil, but she has anointed my feet with ointment.

10. List the acts of love the woman had done for Jesus.         (Luke 7:44-46) you

gave me no water for my feet, but she has bathed my feet with her tears and died them with her hair, she has not stopped kissing my feet, she has anointed my feet with ointment.

11. Jesus' conclusion is stated in Luke 7:47. Therefore, I tell you, her sins, which were many, have been forgiven; hence she has
shown great love. But the one to whom little is forgiven, loves litle

a. Those who are forgiven many sins Have shown greater love

b. Those who are forgiven few sins loves little

 

12. What did Jesus tell the woman?       (Luke 7:48) Your sins are forgiven

13. What did the other guests think about the incident?          (Luke 7:49) Who

is this who even forgives sins

14. How was the woman saved?       (Luke 7:50) Your faith has saved

you; go in peace

 

15. The characters and their debts related in the parable represent the people and their behavior in the story. Match the two columns.


 

 

 

 

 

Parable                                                                    Story

1. the lender or creditor                                                   4.sin

2 the large debtor                                                             2.the woman

3 the small debtor                                                            1. God

4 the debt                                                                         3.Simon

B. THE LESSON

»    All are debtors (sinners) and are in need of God's forgiveness (Rom. 3:23).

 

»    The sinful woman was saved by her faith. She then expressed her

gratitude to Jesus by acts of love. In the same manner when our faith in the Savior leads us to obedience, then our love and gratitude are
expressed in our service to him. The greater our sense of sin, the greater will be our gratitude and love (Luke 7:47).

»     Jesus told the woman to go in peace. When our sins are forgiven, we

too have peace with God through Jesus Christ (Rom. 5:1).

 

 

PARABLES OF REPENTANCE

 

1.4 THE PARABLE OF THE LOST SHEEP Mat. 18:12-14: Luke 15:3-7

 

Ufl5;3 So he told them this parable:4 "Which one ofyou, having a hundred sheep and losing one of them, does not leave the ninety-nine in the
wilderness and go after the one that is lost until he finds it? 5When he has found it, he lays it on his shoulders and rejoices. 6And when he
comes home, he calls together his friends and neighbors, saying to them, 'Rejoice with me, for I have found my sheep that was lost.,7Just so, I tell you, there will be more joy in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety-nine righteous persons who need no repentance.

 

INTRODUCTION. The parable of the lost sheep is about a shepherd

who cares for a hundred sheep, and when one becomes lost, he seeks it until he finds it. The shepherd in the parable represents Jesus who is the


 

 

 

 

good shepherd (John 10:1-18). Although this parable is recorded in both Matthew and Luke, it is likely Jesus spoke the parable on two different
occasions. In Matthew, Jesus was discussing humility with his disciples
and called a little child to him as a model of true humility. Jesus told his disciples in order to enter the kingdom, one must humble himself and be¬ come as a little child. Just as the Son of man is come to save that which is lost, the parable tells of the shepherd who cares for his sheep and seeks the one that wanders away.  God cares for his people and is not willing for any of these "little ones" to peish (Matt. 18:1-14).

In Luke's account of the parable, publicans and sinners surrounded Jesus


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in order to hear him. This caused the Pharisees and scribes to be
offended and murmur that Jesus received sinners and ate with them.
Although the publicans (tax collectors) were themselves Jews, they were
considered as traitors because of their dealings with the Romans. They
were social outcasts as were the "sinners," those who failed to observe the
traditions of the elders, particularly the regulations regarding washing and
purification. As Jesus came to seek and save the lost, He associated with
all classes of the Jewish social order.  He spoke the parable of the lost
sheep to this crowd and compared the publicans and sinners to the lost
sheep. The shepherd in the story searched for his one sheep that had
strayed. Finding the lost sheep, he carried it home on his shoulders
rejoicing. In the same manner Jesus searches for those who are lost, and
there is joy and rejoicing in heaven over one sinner who repents. The
shepherd was a familiar figure in Palestine.  His equipment consisted of a
rod, staff, water-skin, scrip, and sling. The rod was like a shepherd's crook,
used for walking and catching wandering sheep. At night the shepherd
held his rod across the entrance to the sheepfold, and each sheep had to
pass under it. The shepherd could then quickly inspect each sheep as it
passed under the rod into the fold. The staff was a sturdy stick about
three or four feet long with a knob of wood on the top. This was the
shepherd's weapon with which he could beat off wild animals or thieves.
The water-skin contained water for the shepherd, and the scrip held his
food. The sling was extremely important, and shepherds were experts in
the use of a sling consider David's encounter with Goliath (I Sam. 17).
The shepherd did not have a dog to help with the herding. Instead he
used the sling to drop a stone in front of a straying sheep to turn it back to


 

 

 

 

 

the herd.

In New Testament times sheep were used for their wool and seldom for eating. As a result the shepherd knew his sheep and called them by
name. Likewise, the sheep knew their master's voice and responded to
the call of no other. The shepherd walked in front of the sheep, leading them, and risking his life for them. He was the first to encounter the dangers-wiid animals, robbers, dangerous rocky areas. At night the
shepherd laid across the entrance to the fold, for there was no gate; thus he was the door to the sheepfold. The shepherd had to produce the
fleece of any sheep that was missing. Therefore, when a sheep strayed from the flock, the shepherd tracked and searched until he found it, dead or aiive. When the sheep was found alive, there was great rejoicing.

 

A. THE PARABLE

 

1. How many sheep are in the parable?        (Luke 15:3-4) hundred sheep

2. What does the shepherd do when one sheep is lost?         (Luke 15:4)

Which one of you, having a hundred sheep and losing one of them, does not leave the ninety-nine in the wilderness and go after the one that is lost until he finds it

Note.  The wilderness in this instance is a grassy area which is the normal place ofpasture and the proper place to leave the flock.

3. What does the shepherd do when he finds the lost sheep?        (Luke 15:5)

When he has found it, he lays it on his shoulders and rejoices

4. What does he do when he arrives home with the lost sheep?    (Luke

15:6) when he comes home, he calls together his friends and

neighbors, saying to them, 'Rejoice with me, for I have found my sheep that was lost

 

5. What is the meaning of the parable?        (Luke 15:7) there will be more

joy in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety-nine righteous persons who need no repentance.


 

 

 

 

 

B. THE LESSON

»    Jesus is the good shepherd who seeks and saves the lost

(John 10:1-18; Matt. 18:11; Luke 19:10).

»    There is constant joy in heaven over the many who are righteous and faithful, but when one sinner repents, there is sudden and great rejoicing over this lost one who enters the fold of God.

 

PARABLE OF REPENTENCE:

1.5 THE PARABLE OF THE LOST COIN Luke 15:8-10

Lki5:8» Qr w^gt woman hgving ten silver coins, if she loses one of them, does not light a lamp, sweep the house, and search carefully until she inds it? 9When she has found it, she calls together her friends and

neighbors, saying, Rejoice with me, for I have found the coin that I had lost. /10Just so, I tell you, there isjoy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner who repents."

 

INTRODUCTION. The parable of the lost coin forms a pair with the

parable of the lost sheep, and they both have the same general meaning. A woman who had ten silver coins lost one of the coins in her house. She lit a lamp and swept until she found it, then she called her neighbors to rejoice with her. The lost coin like the lost sheep represents the lost
sinner. However, unlike the lost sheep that wanders and strays by itself,
the coin was lost because someone lost it. It is tragic when one sins, but it is even worse when one causes another to sin. In addition, the sheep knows when it is lost, but the coin did not know it was lost just as some people are unaware of their lost condition. In both parables there is great joy and rejoicing in heaven over the repentance of one lost sinner.

Houses of the poor class in Palestine generally had just one or two rooms and the space was shared with the animals. Some houses were
constructed without windows, but others had a small opening near the ceiling for ventilation. Consequently, the houses were dark. The floors might be packed dirt covered with reeds and rushes. Others were made


 

 

 

 

 

of large stones with sizable cracks between them.

The coin in the parable was the Greek drachma which was nearly equal to the Roman denarius, worth about seventeen cents and equal to one day's wage. If the coin was part of the household treasury, its loss would be a large financial hardship. More likely, the coin was part of a necklace or headdress worn by a Jewish woman and part of her dowry. The item was the sign of a married woman and equivalent to our modern wedding ring. Losing one of the pieces of this ornament would, therefore, cause dismay and worry because the sentimental value would be as great as the
monetary value.

 

 

A. THE PARABLE

1.    How many pieces of silver did the woman have, and how many did she lose? (Luke 15:8) what woman having ten silver coins, if she loses one of them

2. What did she do to find the coin?       (Luke 15:8) not light a lamp,

sweep the house, and search carefully until she finds it

3. When she found the coin, what did she do?         (Luke 15:9), she calls

together her friends and neighbors, saying, "Rejoice with me, for I have found the coin that I had lost.

 

4. What occurs when a sinner repents?        (Luke 15:10) there is joy in the

presence of the angels of God over one sinner who repents

5. Jesus came to seek and save the lost, but what is the mission of all

disciples of Christ? Who will be saved?      (Mark 16:15-16) "Go into all the

world and proclaim the good news to the whole creation. The

one who believes and is baptized will be saved; but the one who does not believe will be condemned.


 

 

 

 

 

B. THE LESSON

»    As the woman searched carefully for her coin, so Christians must diligently seek the lost and preach the gospel in order to save sinners.

 

»    Christians must be careful they do not cause others to stumble and sin.

»    There is great joy and rejoicing by the angels over one sinner who repents.

 

It is impossible but that offences will come: but woe unto him, through whom they come! It were better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and he cast into the sea...    Luke 17:1-2

 

 

PARABLE OF REPENTENCE:

1.6 THE PARABLE OF THE PRODIGAL SON Luke 15:11-32

Lk 15:11 jnen jesus sgj^ "There was a man who had two sons. 12The
younger of them said to his father, Father, give me the share of the
property that will belong to me. 'So he divided his property between
them. 13A few days later the younger son gathered all he had and
traveled to a distant country, and there he squandered his property in dissolute living. MWhen he had spent everything, a severe famine took place throughout that country, and he began to be in need. 15So he went and hired himself out to one of the citizens of that country, who sent him to his ields to feed the pigs. 16He would gladly have filled himself with

the pods that the pigs were eating; and no one gave him anything. 17But when he came to himself he said, How many ofmy fathers hired hands have bread enough and to spare, but here lam dying of hunger! 18I will get up and go to my father, and I will say to him, "Father, I have sinned

against heaven and before you; 19Iam no longer worthy to be called your son; treat me like one ofyour hired hands. "/20So he set off and went to his father. But while he was still far off, his father saw him and was filled

with compassion; he ran and put his arms around him and kissed him.

21 Then the son said to him, Father, I have sinned against heaven and


 

 

 

 

before you; I am no longer worthy to be called your son. r22But the father said to his slaves, 'Quickly, bring out a robe—the best one—and put it on him; put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet. 23And get the fatted calf and kill It, and let us eat and celebrate; 24for this son of mine was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found1.'And they began to

celebrate. 25"Now his elder son was in the field; and when he came and approached the house, he heard music and dancing. 26He called one of the slaves and asked what was going on. 27He replied, 'Your brother has come, and your father has killed the fatted calf, because he has got him

back safe and sound. ,2SThen he became angry and refused to go in. His father came out and began to plead with him. 29But he answered his
father, listen! For all these years I have been working like a slave for you, and I have never disobeyed your command; yet you have never
given me even a young goat so that I might celebrate with my friends. 30But when this son ofyours came back, who has devoured your property with prostitutes, you killed the fatted calf for him!'31 Then the father said to him, Son, you are always with me, and all that is mine is yours. 32But we had to celebrate and rejoice, because this brother ofyours was dead and has come to life; he was lost and has been found.'"

 

INTRODUCTION. In the fifteenth chapter of Luke, Jesus spoke three parables-the lost sheep, the lost coin, and the prodigal son, or sometimes appropriately referred to as the lost son. It is important to remember to whom Jesus was speaking. Jesus was surrounded by two groups-the
publicans (tax collectors) and sinners who were the moral outcasts of
Jewish society, and the self-righteous Pharisees and scribes.
The Pharisees' concept of God was that He approved of good people but had no use for sinners. In these three parables Jesus teaches that God seeks the sinner, waiting and watching for him to come and partake of the blessings of the kingdom, and that there is great joy in heaven over one sinner who repents. Jesus called the publicans and sinners to repent, and He called the Pharisees and scribes to accept the sinner and rejoice in his salvation. The parable of the prodigal son is about a father and his two sons. The younger son, tiring of parental supervision, asked his father for his portion of the inheritance. The Jewish laws of inheritance were
specific-the elder son was to receive a double portion (Deut. 21:17). In this case the elder son would receive two-thirds of the inheritance and the


 

 

 

 

 

younger son one-third.

After receiving his portion, the younger son went to a far country and
spent all he had in riotous or wasteful living. When a famine arose his only means of employment was feeding swine, the unclean animals Jews were forbidden to eat or touch (Lev. 11:1-8). He even desired the food of the pigs, probably the seed pod of the carob tree of which the pod or husk alone was eaten. Presently the young man "came to himself1 and decided to return to his father, confess his sin, and ask to become a hired servant. There were three classes of servants on a Jewish estate: there were the bondservants who belonged to the master but enjoyed numerous
privileges (Ex. 21:2-6; Lev. 25:39-46); there were the lower class servants
who were subordinate to the bondmen (Luke 12:45); there were the
temporary hired servants who were hired on a daily basis. Thus the son intended to ask his father to make him a hired servant, one of the lowest rank. However, he never had the opportunity to make the request.

While the returning son was still afar off, his father ran to him to greet him. When the young man confessed his sin, his father interrupted him and ordered that his son be honored with three significant items: the
robe, the best robe, kept for special guests and festive occasions; the ring,
the signet ring, symbolizing authority; sandals, signifying   sonship, for slaves went barefoot. The fatted calf was killed and there was a merry feast.

Unlike the two previous parables, this one does not end with the joyful celebration. The father had an elder son who was angry and envious of the honor bestowed upon his brother. As the younger son, the prodigal, symbolized the publicans and sinners, the elder son represented the selfrighteous Pharisees who would rather see punishment for sinners than forgiveness. The elder son was a good man, but his goodness was hard and cold, without love and mercy.

The loving father, the real hero of the story, is a reflection of the merciful God. He was forgiving and rejoiced when his younger lost son repented and was found. He pleaded tenderly with the elder son to accept his
brother and celebrate his return. The father told his elder son, "...all that I have is thine." The inheritance had already been divided, all that


 

 

 

 

 

remained belonged to the elder son. These words of the father declare

the nature of the kingdom of God, for all spiritual blessings are to be found in the heavenly places in Christ (Eph. 1:3).

 

A. THE PARABLE

 

1. This story concerns what three characters?        (Luke 15:11) a man who

had two sons.

2. What did the younger son ask of his father?         (Luke 15:12) Father,

give me the share of the property that will belong to me/

3. What did he do some days later?   (Luke 15:13) the younger son

gathered all he had and traveled to a distant country, and there he squandered his property in dissolute living.

4. What happened when he had spent all his inheritance?          (Luke 15:14) a

severe famine took place throughout that country, and he began to be in need

5. What occurred next?     (Luke 15:15-16) he went and hired himself

out to one of the citizens of that country, who sent him to his fields to feed the pigs. He would gladly have filled himself with the pods that the pigs were eating; and no one gave him
anything

6.How did he reason with himself?      (Luke 15:17) How many of my

father's hired hands have bread enough and to spare, but here I am dying of hunger

 

7. What did he determine to tell his father when he returned home?           (Luke

15:18-19) 18I will get up and go to my father, and I will say to

him, "Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you; 19I am no longer worthy to be called your son; treat me like one of your hired hands.

8. What occurred when he was still afar off?        (Luke 15:20), his father

saw him and was filled with compassion; he ran and put his


 

 

 

 

 

arms around him and kissed him.

 

Note.   The kiss indicated reconciliation and peace.

9. What did the son tell his father?     (Luke 15:21) 'Father, I have sinned

against heaven and before you; I am no longer worthy to be called your son/

10. What did the father order?   (Luke 15:22-23) father said to his

slaves, 'Quickly, bring out a robe—the best one—and put it on him; put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet. 23And get the fatted calf and kill it, and let us eat and celebrate;

 

11. What did the father tell the servants about his son?           (Luke 15:24)

24for this son of mine was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found!'

12. Where was the elder son? What did he hear as he returned home? (Luke 15:25) elder son was in the field; and when he came and approached the house, he heard music and dancing.

13. Whom did he call to inquire about what he heard? What was the

response? (Luke 15:26-27) He called one of the slaves and asked

what was going on. He replied, 'Your brother has come, and your father has killed the fatted calf, because he has got him back
safe and sound

14. What was the elder son's reaction? Who pleaded with him?

(Luke 15:28) His father came out and began to plead with him.

15. What was the elder son's complaint?        (Luke 15:29-30) Listen! For all

these years I have been working like a slave for you, and I have never disobeyed your command; yet you have never given me even a young goat so that I might celebrate with my friends. But when this son of yours came back, who has devoured your
property with prostitutes, you killed the fatted calf for him!

16. What was the father's answer?       (Luke 15:31) 'Son, you are always

with me, and all that is mine is yours.


 

 

 

 

 

17. How does the parable end?           (Luke 15:32) we had to celebrate and

rejoice, because this brother of yours was dead and has come to life; he was lost and has been found.

Note.   The parable ends without our knowing what the elder brother did. He had been working in the field, but his father invited him to the feast. In the same manner the Pharisees who had been careful to do the works of the law were invited by Jesus to partake of the joys of the kingdom. Did they accept the invitation?

 

B. THE LESSON

 

» God is loving and forgiving, waiting and watching for sinners to repent and come to him.

»    There is great joy and celebration in heaven when one sinner repents. » -. Christians must be forgiving, too, accepting those who repent and rejoicing in their salvation.

 

...Son, thou art ever with me, and all that I have is thine. It was meet that we should make merry, and be glad: for this thy brother was dead, and is alive again; and was lost, and is found. Luke 15:31-32

 

 

1.7 A PARABLE OF JEWS AND GENTILES

THE PARABLE OF THE WICKED HUSBANDMEN

Matt. 21:33-46; Mark 12:1-12; Luke 20:9-18

Mt 21:33 »LjSfen o another parable. There was a landowner who planted a vineyard, put a fence around it, dug a wine press in it, and built a
watchtower. Then he leased it to tenants and went to another country.

34 When the harvest time had come, he sent his slaves to the tenants to collect his produce. 35But the tenants seized his slaves and beat one, killed another, and stoned another. 3t"Again he sent other slaves, more


 

 

 

 

than the first; and they treated them in the same way. 37Finally he sent his son to them, saying, 'They will respect my son. /38But when the
tenants saw the son, they said to themselves, 'This is the heir; come, let us kiil him and get his inheritance. "39So they seized him, threw him out of the vineyard, and killed him. 40Now when the owner of the vineyard comes, what will he do to those tenants?"41 They said to him, "He will put those wretches to a miserable death, and lease the vineyard to other
tenants who will give him the produce at the harvest time. "42Jesus said to them, "Have you never read in the scriptures: 'The stone that the
builders rejected has become the cornerstone; this was the Lords doing,
and it is amazing in our eyes'? *3Therefore I tell you, the kingdom of God will be taken away from you and given to a people that produces the
fruits of the kingdom. ^The one who falls on this stone will be broken to pieces; and it will crush anyone on whom it falls. "45When the chief
priests and the Pharisees heard his parables, they realized that he was speaking about them. 46They wanted to arrest him, but they feared the crowds, because they regarded him as a prophet.

INTRODUCTION. This parable was spoken by Jesus on Tuesday of his final week on earth. By that time the Jewish rulers were actively plotting to put Jesus to death. The parable is about a man who planted a vineyard. Vineyards were common in Palestine, and grapes were the most important fruit in Judea. After the landowner planted the grapevines, he put a fence of wood or stone or a hedge of thorns around the vineyard to protect it

from the wild animals. A watch tower was built in the middle of the

vineyard as a lookout against thieves and animals, especially foxes. A

winepress was also provided. The press consisted of two vats dug in the ground and lined with stone. The vats were dug on different levels and connected with channels. The grapes were trodden on the upper level, generally by the feet of men, and the juice ran through the openings and was collected in the lower vat.

The parable of the wicked husbandmen is distinct from others in that every detail has meaning:

♦ the vineyard is the nation of Israel;

• the householder or master of the vineyard is God;


 

 

 

 

 

• the husbandmen are the priests, scribes, and eiders of the Jews;

• the servants who were sent are the prophets of God;

• the son is Jesus.

 

A. THE PARABLE AND THE MEANING

 

1. God cared for his chosen people, the children of Israel, and "planted" them in the land of Canaan.

a.      Describe the vineyard.     (Matt. 21:33) landowner planted a

vineyard,

b.      put a fence around it, dug a wine press in it, and built a

watchtower

b. Before the householder went away, to whom did he lease his vineyard? (Matt. 21:33) he leased it to tenants

2. God was patient and sent his prophets to his people.

a. What did the husbandmen (vinedressers) do to the servants that came to receive the fruits-the householder's share of the produce? (Matt. 21:34-
35) But the tenants seized his slaves and beat one, killed
another, and stoned another

b. What did they do to the second group of servants?         (Mat. 21:36) he

sent other slaves, more than the first; and they treated them in the same way

3. God then sent his own Son.

a. How did the householder perceive his son would be received?

(Matt. 21:37) Finally he sent his son to them, saying, 'They will respect my son

b How does Mark describe the son?       (Mark 12:6) He had still one

other, a beloved son. Finally he sent him to them, saying, 'They will respect my son

Why did the husbandmen kill the son?      (Matt. 21:38) This is the heir;

come, let us kill him and get his inheritance


 

 

 

 

Note.  The Jewish rulers plotted the death ofJesus because they feared they would lose their inheritance-their place or position of religious
authority, and their nation-the civil government they dominated (John 11:47-53).

 

d. Where was the son killed?       (Matt. 21:39) threw him out of the

vineyard, and killed him.

E Where was Jesus crucified?      (Heb. 13:12) Jesus suffered outside the

city gate in order to sanctify the people by his own blood

4.  Because his Son was rejected, God destroyed the nation of Israel. His kingdom was taken from them and given to another nation, the Gentiles.

a. Jesus asked his listeners what the lord of the vineyard would do to the husbandmen when he returned. What was their answer?
(Matt. 21:40-41) "He will put those wretches to a miserable death, and lease the vineyard to other tenants who will give him the produce at the harvest time." 42Jesus said to them, "Have you never read in the scriptures: 'The stone that the builders
rejected has become the cornerstone;

b. What did they say the lord would do with his vineyard?         (Matt. 21:41)

lease the vineyard to other

c. Jesus.asked if they had read the scriptures and quoted Ps. 118:22-23. 'The stone which the builders rejected, the same is become the
cornerstone" (Matt. 21:42)

Note. Jesus (the stone) who was rejected by the builders (the Jews) was the cornerstone or foundation of the kingdom, the church.

d. As the vineyard was taken from the wicked husbandmen and given to others, so the kingdom was taken from the Jews and given to whom? (Matt. 21:43), the kingdom of God will be taken away from you

r              and given to a people that produces the fruits of the kingdom.

e. Paul stated that the salvation of God was sent unto whom? Why?

(Acts 28:28) Let it be known to you then that this salvation of God has been sent to the Gentiles; they will listen


 

 

 

 

The general meaning of the parable is clear. God sent his servants forth offering the blessings of the kingdom. Those who refuse the invitation and reject Jesus will be excluded from the kingdom. Those who hear the message and receive it will be partakers of the kingdom and in communion with Jesus Christ.

 

Specifically, the parable teaches that the Jews who were God's chosen

people received the original invitation to the kingdom. When they refused the blessings offered by God and rejected his Son, the invitation or gospel was then extended to the Gentiles and others who were more worthy to receive the blessings of the kingdom.

 

A. THE PARABLE

 

1. What did one of the guests invited to the home of the Pharisee say?

(Luke 14:15) "Blessed is anyone who will eat bread in the kingdom of God!"

2. When the "certain man" sent his servants to bid the guests to come to his feast, what happened? (Luke 14:16-18) they all alike began to

make excuses

Note.  The "certain man " who made the great supper represents God.

3. What excuse did the first man offer?        (Luke 14:18) 'I have bought a

piece of land, and I must go out and see it; please accept my regrets.'

Note.   This excuse was one of necessity. Because of his possessions the man could not come, and he asked to be excused.

4. What excuse did the second man give?         (Luke 14:19) 'I have bought

a piece of land, and I must go out and see it; please accept my regrets.'

Note.   This excuse was one concerning the affairs of business. It was not convenient for the man to come, and he asked to be excused.


 

 

 

 

 

5. What excuse did the third man make?         (Luke 14:20) 'I have just

been married, and therefore I cannot come.

Note.  This excuse was one regarding social obligations. It was impossible for the man to come, and he did not ask to be excused.

6. When the master heard the report of the servant, what did he instruct him to do? (Luke 14:21) Then the owner of the house became
angry and said to his slave, 'Go out at once into the streets and lanes of the town and bring in the poor, the crippled, the blind, and the lame.'

7. When the servant obeyed, what did he tell his master?   (Luke 14:22)

'Sir, what you ordered has been done, and there is still room/'

 

8. What did the lord then command the servant? (Luke 14:23) xGo out

into the roads and lanes, and compel people to come in, so that my house may be filled.

9. What did the lord say about the guests who had been invited originally?

(Luke 14:24) 24For I tell you, none of those who were invited will taste my dinner.

 

 

B. THE LESSON

 

»    God has extended his invitation to come and partake of his kingdom. Those who make excuses or delay will lose their place.

»    We should not delay because of the love of possessions, the affairs of business, or social obligations. These become stumbling blocks when they interfere with our service to Christ and his church.

»   There is room in the kingdom.

Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.


 

 

 

 

 

Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in

heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light. Matt. 11:28-30

 

 

 

1.9   The parables of the kingdom

THE PARABLE OF THE LABORERS IN THE VINEYARD

(The generous employee) Matt. 20:1-16

 

 

Mt 20:1 "For the kingdom of heaven is like a landowner who went out

early in the morning to hire laborers for his vineyard. 2After agreeing with the laborers for the usual daily wage, he sent them into his vineyard.

3 When he went out about nine o"clock, he saw others standing idle In the marketplace; 4and he said to them, You also go into the vineyard, and I will pay you whatever is right. 'So they went. 5When he went out again about noon and about three o'tlock, he did the same. 6And about five o'tlock he went out and found others standing around; and he said to them, 'Why are you standing here idle all day?'7They said to him,
Because no one has hired us. 'He said to them, 'You also go into the
vineyard. ,8When evening came, the owner of the vineyard said to his manager, 'Call the laborers and give them their pay, beginning with the last and then going to the irst ,9When those hired about five o'tlock

came, each of them received the usual dally wage. 10Now when the             irst

came, they thought they would receive more; but each of them also

received the usual daily wage. nAnd when they received it, they

grumbled against the landowner,i2saying, 'These last worked only one hour, and you have made them equal to us who have borne the burden of the day and the scorching heat.,13But he replied to one of them,

Friend, I am doing you no wrong; did you not agree with me for the

usual daily wage? 14Take what belongs to you and go; I choose to give to this last the same as I give to you. 15Am I not allowed to do what I
choose with what belongs to me? Or are you envious because I am
generous?'16So the last will be first, and the first will be last."


 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION. This parable is found only in Matthew and follows the story of the rich young ruler (Matt. 19:16-22). After the young man went

away sorrowfully because he had great possessions, Peter asked Jesus, "Behold, we have forsaken all, and followed thee; what shall we have therefore?" (Matt. 19:27). Apparently Peter had the concept of "so much work-so much reward." The Jews believed in a doctrine of merit; that is, by keeping the law and doing good deeds, one could

come to God and claim rewards. But eternal life is the gift of God, "For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves:  it is the gift of God:  Not of works, lest any man should boast" (Eph. 2:8-9). This
parable teaches that God rules in his kingdom and literally gives his grace to all who come to him. The Law of Moses required that hired laborers be paid at the end of the day's work

(Lev. 19:13). The worker was to be paid each day before sunset because he was poor and needed the money for himself and his family (Deut.
24:15). A normal day's wage was a denarius (penny, KJV; shilling, ASV), worth about seventeen cents.

In Palestine the grape harvest occurred at the end of August and early

September. The rains came about the middle of September, so gathering the grapes before the rainy season commenced required every available worker. The work day began at 6 a.m. and continued to 6 p.m.

 

A. THE PARABLE

 

The kingdom of heaven is like a man that did what?        (Matt. 20:1) Who

went early in the morning to hire labourers.

 

2. What was the agreed upon wage? (Matt. 20:2) Usual daily wage

3. What agreement did the householder make at the third hour with those

in

the marketplace?    (Matt. 20:3-4) I will pay you what ever is right.

 

Note.  There was no agreement regarding a specific amount for the

wage.


 

 

 

 

 

4. What other times did the householder look for workers?          (Matt. 20:5-6)

noon & 3, 5 O'clock

5. What reason did those at the eleventh hour give for being idle?             (Matt.

20:7) Because no one has hired us.

 

6. What instructions did the lord of the vineyard give to his steward when

evening came?     (Matt. 20:8) Call the laborers & give them their pay,

beginning with the last & then going to the first.

7. Those hired at the eleventh hour received what wage?           (Matt.  20:9)

Usual daily wage

8. What did those hired at the first hour receive?         (Matt. 20:10) They

received the usual daily wage

9. What was their reaction?        (Matt. 20:ll-12)They grumbled against

the land owner saying that these last worked only one hour & you made them equal to us.

10. What was the lord's response?     (Matt. 20:13-14) Im doing no

wrong, did you not agree with me for the usual daily wage.

11. The lord said it was lawful for him to do what he wanted with his

own. Then he asked the complaining labourers if their eye was evil. (Mt. 20:15)

Note. An evil eye is an expression referring to jealousy.  Those who were hired first were envious of the others who received the same wage.

 

12. Who shall be first? Who shall be last?       (Matt. 20:16) The last will be

first & the last will be first

 

Note. In the parable those who were hired last received their wages                                                                                                                       irst.

In the kingdom it is the quality ofservice that is Important, not the length

ofservice or seniority. Gods promised reward to the laborer in his kingdom is the gift of eternal life and is available to all who serve him.


 

 

 

 

 

B. THE LESSON

»    God continually seeks those to work in his vineyard (kingdom).

 

»    God's reward, eternal life, is bestowed by his grace, not by our works. The reward is given to all workers in God's kingdom, whether one comes at an early or late age.

 

 

The Parable of the self Righteousness & humility.

1.10 THE PARABLE OF THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN

1.11 Luke 18:9-14

 

Lkl8;9 He also told this parable to some who trusted in themselves that they were righteous and regarded others with contempt: 10"Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax
collector. nThe Pharisee, standing by himself, was praying thus, 'God, I

thank you that I am not like other people: thieves, rogues, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. 12I fast twice a week; I give a tenth of all my income. '13But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even look up

to heaven, but was beating his breast and saying, 'God, be merciful to me, a sinner!'14I tell you, this man went down to his home justi ied

rather than the other; for all who exalt themselves will be humbled, but all who humble themselves will be exalted."

INTRODUCTION. The setting for this parable is the temple in Jerusalem which was the designated place of prayer. The times of prayer were 9 a.m. and 3 p.m., but men went there at any time if they were near and desired to pray. If one was far away, he directed his prayer toward the temple at the appropriate time. An example of this is Daniel while in
Babylonian captivity praying three times daily at his window which faced Jerusalem (Dan. 6:10). In this story two men went to the temple to
pray-a Pharisee and a publican. These two men represent the extremes
of the Jewish religious and social classes of that day.

THE PHARISEES. This religious group was the strictest sect of the Jews (Acts 26:5). TTie sentiments of their beliefs began in the hearts and minds


 

 

 

 

 

of the Jews af-ter their return to the land of Israel from Babylonian

captivity in accordance to the decree of Cyrus in 539 B. C. (Ezra 1:1-4). Some of the returning captives believed in a strict separation between themselves and the neighboring heathen peoples. Eventually these Jews became known as Pharisees or "separatists" which is the meaning of the word.

 

The Pharisees were careful students of the Law of Moses and interpreted the law with exactness, but to the written law they added their traditions.

They believed that additions to the written law had been spoken by Moses to the elders of Israel, and that these additions had been passed orally down through the ages, with the prophets also making additions. Thus these oral additions to the law, numbering in the thousands, covered every action of their daily lives and became traditions to be followed as carefully as the written law.

Consequently, the Pharisees separated themselves from those who did not strictly observe these traditions, shunning social contacts and business dealings with them. Becoming haughty and self-righteous, they divided all mankind into two classes: themselves and the rest of the world.

THE PUBLICANS. Taxes, taxes, and more taxes! The Roman governors were in charge of all financial matters. The general or direct taxes were collected by Roman officers as a part of their official duties. These taxes went into the imperial treasury and were very heavy. A census was taken by the Romans in Egypt, and thus perhaps throughout the whole empire, every fourteen years. The purpose of the census was to levy a poll tax-a tax for the privilege of existing.

In addition, the Romans required a certain amount of customs or tolls

from a specified area. The right to collect these taxes was sold to the

highest bidders called publicans. These publicans or tax collectors paid to Rome the required amount of taxes and then kept for themselves anything they collected over that amount. There were import and export taxes on everything that went in and out of the country: taxes for entering a
walled city, market, or harbor; taxes for crossing a bridge; taxes for using roads; taxes on carts hauling merchandise; taxes on each wheel of the


 

 

 

 

 

cart; taxes on the animal pulling the cart. Taxes, taxes, and more taxes!

Naturally these publicans were extremely unpopular, for many were

dishonest and made their living by extorting high taxes from the citizens. Those publicans who were Jews were doubly despised by their fellow countrymen for selling themselves to the Romans. They were considered as sinners and renegades.

THE PARABLE. This parable thus contrasts the haughty, self-righteous attitude of the Pharisee with the humble manner of the publican. The
Pharisee prayed a short prayer of Ts." Five times the Pharisee said "I" in his prayer (Luke 18:11-12; KJV). Although the law set aside one day of the year for fasting, the Day of Atonement now known as Yom Kip pur
(Lev. 23:27-32), this man fasted twice weekly according to the traditions of the Pharisees. The law required tithing of the fruit of the field and the firstlings of the flocks and herds (Deut. 14:22-23), but this man gave in addition tithes of the tiny herbs of the garden according to the traditions of the Pharisees (Matt. 23:23). In his prayer the Pharisee asked for nothing, confessed nothing, and contrasted his virtues to the sins of the publican.

 

The publican, meanwhile, stood afar off. He did not lit his eyes to

heaven, but smote his breast and prayed for mercy. The Pharisee full of pride believed he was justified before God, for he had not only kept the law, he had gone beyond it. Yet the publican was the one who went home justified, for he humbled himself and asked for mercy.

 

A. THE PARABLE

1. To whom was this parable spoken?      (Luke 18:9) to some who

trusted in themselves that they were righteous and regarded others with contempt

Note.  The parable is addressed to all with such attitudes.   The Pharisee merely becomes the example.

Who went to the temple to pray?      (Luke 18:10) Two men went up to

the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector


 

 

 

 

 

3. Describe the Pharisee's prayer.        (Luke 18:11-12) God, I thank you

that I am not like other people: thieves, rogues, adulterers, or

even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week; I give a tenth of all my income.

4. Describe the publican's prayer.       (Luke 18:13) But the tax collector,

standing far off, would not even look up to heaven, but was

beating his breast and saying, "God, be merciful to me, a sinner

5. Which man was justified? Why? (Luke 18:14) I tell you, this man went down to his home justified rather than the other; for all who exalt themselves will be humbled, but all who humble themselves will be exalted

6. To whom is the Lord nigh (near)? Whom does He save?           (Ps. 34:18)

The Lord is near to the brokenhearted, and saves the crushed in spirit

7. Whom does God resist? To whom does He give grace?           (Jas. 4:6) But

he gives all the more grace; therefore it says, "God opposes the proud, but gives grace to the humble.

 

8. If we humble ourselves, God will do what?        (Jas. 4:10) Humble

yourselves before the Lord, and he will exalt you.

B. THE LESSON

»    Jesus stated the lesson of the parable, "...every one that exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted" (Luke 18:14).

» Those who are humble, asking for God's mercy, will be justified, but those who are self-righteous, confessing nothing and asking for nothing, God will resist.

 

Sec II    ACCEPT GODS OFFER OF SALVATION TODAY

The message of Jesus is not only proclamation of the salvation to sinners as seen in the 1st 10 parables. It is also the announcement of judgment, it is also a cry of mourning, it is a call of repentance, in view of the
urgency of the crises.


 

 

 

 

Over & over again Jesus raises this warning. He strives to open the eyes of blinded people asking them to repent today not tomorrow telling them that nothing should prevent them from taking this critical decision.
Therefore they are called CRISES PARABLES. These parables are
divided in to 5 groups

 

2:1 Act now before to is too late        10 Parables

2:2 Act now take necessary action      7 Parables

2:3 Act now let nothing impede you   7 Parables

2:4 Act now it is supremely worthy.  2 Parables

2:5 Act now this is your last chance   1 Parables

 

What Jesus said—CRISES PARABLES—impeding catastrophe—harsh— where the good & bad would be separated—be prepared—negative
Early church context—Parousia (end times)—Glorious coming of Jesussudden coming positive not = to original setting—similes reflect the same challenge

 

 

2:1 ACT NOW BEFORE IT IS TOO LATE.  10 Parables

2:1.1 NOCTURNAL BURGLAR          Mt 24:43-44;    Lk 12:39-40

2:1.2 THE 10 MAIDENS                        Mt25:  1-13.

2:1.3 THE DOOR KEEPER                   Mt 13:33-37;     Lk    12:35-38

2: 1.4 SERVENT ENTRUSTED WITH SUPERVISION

Mt 24: 45 - 51; Lk    12 : 42 - 46

2: 1.5 TALENTS                             Mt 25 : 14 - 30;  Lk 19 : 12 - 27

2: 1.6 THE WEDDING GARMENTS                        Mt 22: 11 - 13.

2: 1.7 Simile snare & the unwary (bird)                     Lk 21: 34 - 36

2:1.8   Simile- Budding Fig tree Mk 13: 28, 29. Lk 17: 26 - 27; 28 - 30.

2:1.9 Simile concerning harvest time Mt 24 : 32 - 33; Lk 21 : 29 - 31

2: 1.10 EYE LAMP OF THE BODY Mt: 22 -23; Lk 11: 34 - 36

 

2:1 ACT NOW BEFORE IT IS TOO LATE.  10 Parables

2:1.1 NOCTURNAL BURGLAR          Mt 24:43-44;   Lk 12:39-40

1. understanding the P in J ministry (setting) in both the accounts.

The Parable has 2 parts           Vs 43—1    ^  Vs 44—11


 

 

 

 

The first part goes back to Jesus—actual burglary—some thing topical / Jesus warns of a catastrophe

2. In the context of the early church    II part. Son of man—title of the resurrected Xt.

—refers to parousia -end times shift.                             2nd coming was

delayed

On a positive note Mt 24:43—disciples / members

Lk 12:41—leaders

3. Symbol of the thief comes for the first time—1 Tes 5:2,              2 Pet 3:10

Thief is a figurative form of a sudden eruption (day of the Lord coming as

a thief) Rev 3:3;       16:15. Christ as a thief

Jesus comes as a thief for the unbelievers (negative) here the children of light—prepared (positive) the others are taken unaware.
Joachim Jeremiah (JJ) The fact that Jesus relates the P of the burglar to the impeding catastrophe does not mean that the parousia was out side his field of vision, on the other hand. The fact that the early church
related the parable to his return. Does not imply that new nothing of the impeding catastrophe that must preceded

— Crowds

Jesus                                             TRIBULATION                 Coming of Xt

   Disciples

 

2:1.2 THE 10 MAIDENS .

THE PARABLE OF THE TEN VIRGINS Matt. 25:1-13

Mt 25:1 'Then the kingdom of heaven will be like this. Ten bridesmaids took their lamps and went to meet the bridegroom. 2Five of them were foolish, and five were wise. 3When the foolish took their lamps, they took no oil with them; 4but the wise took flasks of oil with their lamps. 5As the bridegroom was delayed, all of them became drowsy and slept. 6But at midnight there was a shout, "Look! Here is the bridegroom! Come out to

meet him. "7Then all those bridesmaids got up and trimmed their lamps. 8The foolish said to the wise, "Give us some ofyour oil, for our lamps are

going out. "9But the wise replied, "No! there will not be enough for you and for us; you had better go to the dealers and buy some for
yourselves. "10And while they went to buy it, the bridegroom came, and those who were ready went with him into the wedding banquet; and the


 

 

 

 

door was shut uLater the other bridesmaids came also, saying, "Lord, lord, open to us. "12But he replied, "Truly I tell you, I do not know you." 13Keep awake therefore, for you know neither the day nor the hour.

INTRODUCTION. The parable of the ten virgins is a story based on the wedding customs of Palestine in New Testament times. There were two stages to a Jewish marriage. First there was the betrothal which was a
promise of marriage and a binding agreement. Although the betrothed
couple did not live together, they were considered legally married.
Breaking the agreement required a bill of divorcement. Unfaithfulness was considered adultery (Deut. 22:23-24).

 

The second stage was a ceremony that involved "bringing home the

bride." The bridegroom's friends escorted the bride and her attendants

from the bride's home to the home of the groom. Generally the

procession occurred at night with the participants carrying torches. As the procession wound along the streets of the city or village, the onlookers would shout with joy.

After the wedding party entered the groom's house, a marriage supper followed. The festivities continued for a week with the bride and groom treated as royalty, wearing their finest clothes and doing no work. Love songs were sung, speeches were made in honor of the couple, and
elaborate feasts were prepared for the guests.

This parable then is a description of the festive occasion known as

"bringing home the bride." However, the story does not concern the

bride, but rather the young virgins who were part of the wedding party. Young women, virgins, prepared the bride at her home to receive her bridegroom. The exact time of his arrival was unknown, and in this case, he was delayed. When the bridegroom did arrive to claim his bride, the joyous procession to the groom's home began. Since these festivities occurred at night, the attendants of the bride and groom carried torches for illumination.

The lamps or torches were made of oil-drenched rags inserted in a copper vessel which was attached to a long pole. The lamp contained very little


 

 

 

 

oil, and a fresh supply had to be added frequently. The reserve supply of oil was carried in another vessel in the other hand of the torchbearer.

In the parable, five of the young women or virgins were wise and five

were foolish. All took their lamps, but only five took an extra supply of oil. When it was time to meet the bridegroom and join the procession, the five foolish virgins did not have enough oil to keep their lamps burning. While they went to find more oil, the procession concluded, and the five foolish virgins were shut out of the feast.

The parable represents Jesus as the bridegroom and his return. Those who are wise will constantly endeavor to do the will of God and thus be prepared for Jesus' coming. Those who are foolish and negligent will be unprepared and excluded from the kingdom when Jesus returns.

 

A. THE PARABLE

 

1.         The kingdom of heaven is like what?      (Matt. 25:1) Ten bridesmaids

took their iampsand went to meet the bridegroom

2. Describe the ten virgins.       (Matt. 25:2-4) Five of them were foolish,

and five were wise. 3When the foolish took their lamps, they took no oil with them; but the wise took flasks of oil with their lamps.

 

3. What did they do while the bridegroom tarried?         (Matt. 25:5) all of

them became drowsy and slept.

4. When did the bridegroom come? What did the virgins do?

(Matt. 25:6-7) bridesmaids got up and trimmed their lamps.

5. What did the foolish virgins ask of the wise virgins?         (Matt. 25:8) Give

us some of your oil, for our lamps are going out."

6. What did the wise virgins answer?       (Matt. 25 No! there will not be

enough for you and for us; you had better go to the dealers and buy some for yourselves."


 

 

 

 

 

7.While the foolish virgins were away, what occurred?       (Matt. 25:10), the

bridegroom came, and those who were ready went with him into the wedding banquet; and the door was shut.

 

8. When the foolish virgins arrived, what did they say?         (Matt. 25:11)

Lord, lord, open to us."

 

9. What was the answer? (Matt. 25:12) Truly I tell you, I do not know you

 

10. What is the application of the parable?       (Matt. 25:13)." Keep awake

therefore, for you know neither the day nor the hour.

 

 

B. THE LESSON

»    We do not know when Christ will come again.

»    We must watch and be prepared which is the responsibility of each individual.

 

 

2:1.3 THE DOOR KEEPER —Mt 13:33-37.

The parable of the importance of preparing for the future

THE PARABLE OF THE WATCHFUL SERVANTS Luke 12:35-40

Lk 12-.3S•„ Be ffQssQci for acaon ancjnave y0ur iampsHt; 36be like those

who are waiting for their master to return from the wedding banque            , so

that they may open the door for him as soon as he comes and knocks. 37Blessed are those slaves whom the master finds alert when he comes;

truly I tell you, he will fasten his belt and have them sit down to eat, and he will come and serve them. 38Ifhe comes during the middle of the
night, or near dawn, and finds them so, blessed are those slaves. 39"But

know this: if the owner of the house had known at what hour the thief was coming, he would not have let his house be broken into. 40You also must be ready, for the Son ofMan is coming at an unexpected hour."


 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION. We do not know the hour the Son of man comes. In this parable Jesus presented to his disciples two illustrations for
watchfulness. The first illustration promises a joyful occasion, the second is a warning of impending calamity.

In the first incident servants were admonished to watch for the return of their lord who was at a wedding. Whatever time the lord knocked, the servants were expected to immediately open the door and receive their lord with honor. Then the joyful event took place, for the master took the place of the servants. He made his servants sit at his table, and he served them.

The second illustration concerned a robbery. If the master of the house had known what hour the thief was coming, he would have watched and prevented the theft from occurring. Houses in New Testament times were built of stone or clay. The roofs consisted of light beams laid across the walls, with the spaces between filled with clay, closely packed rushes and reeds. It was relatively easy for thieves to dig a hole in the wails or roof, breakthrough, and plunder the house.

The meaning of the parable is clear. The disciples and ail believers are told to watch and wait for the Lord's return which involves both a great promise and a warning. To those who are prepared, the coming of Jesus will be a joyous event. Jesus, like the master in the parable, will reward those servants who are faithful and watching. For those who are
unprepared, Jesus' coming will be sudden and unexpected, like a thief who breaks in and brings disaster.

 

A. THE PARABLE

 

1. What instructions did Jesus give to his disciples?       (Luke 12:35) Be

dressed for action and have your lamps lit

2. They were to be like servants waiting for what?         (Luke 12:36) waiting

for their master

 

3. When the lord returns, what will he do for the faithful servants?           (Luke

12:37) Blessed are those slaves whom the master finds alert


 

 

 

 

 

when he comes; truly I tell you, he will fasten his belt and have them sit down to eat, and he will come and serve them

4. The servants will be blessed if they are watching even If the master

comes at what time? (Luke 12:38) If he comes during the middle of the night or near dawn, and finds them so, blessed are those slaves.

5. How can the master prevent the thief from breaking into his house? (Luke 12:39) he would not have let his house be broken into.

6. Why does Jesus warn us to be ready?    (Luke 12:40) 40You also must

be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an unexpected hour

B. THE LESSON

»    The primary application of the parable is the second coming of Jesus. We must be prepared for no man knows the hour of Jesus' return.

»    There is a secondary principle which applies to every individual. We must be prepared for no one knows when death will come.

Blessed are those servants, whom the lord when he cometh shall find watching... Be ye therefore ready also: for the Son of man cometh at an hour when ye think not Luke 12:37, 40

 

 

2: 1.4    SERVANT ENTRUSTED WITH SUPERVISION

Mt 24: 45 - 51; Lk 12 : 42 - 46

Mt 24:45-5145"Who then is the faithful and wise slave, whom his master has

put in charge of his household, to give the other slaves their allowance of food at the proper time? ^Blessed is that slave whom his master will find at work when he arrives. 47 Truly I tell you, he will put that one in charge of all his
possessions. 48But if that wicked slave says to himself, My master is delayed,'

49and he begins to beat his fellow slaves, and eats and drinks with drunkards, 50the master of that slave will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour that he does not know. 51He will cut him in pieces and put him with the hypocrites, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.


 

 

 

 

 

1. understanding the Parables in Jesus ministry (setting).

When the master is away vs Who is the faithful servant; who is the wise servant

Why is this Parable addressed to the early leaders; because of their understanding of the early church..

Delay of the Master was the delay of the Parousia .

In Matthews context:- Master of the house is the son of man, coming to judge the world

Matthew would point to the disciples not to fail in them trust because of the delayLk 12 : 41 Interprets as speaking to the apostles Peter said JJ A sterner reckoning would be demanded of them, if they allow the delay of the parousia to cause them to abuse their office.
CONTINUED in PARABLES II


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